8 Responses

  1. Mike@Idioms and Phrases

    The energy bill in my home is quite expensive, even when I am trying my best to use the heater/AC as little as possible, and making sure the lights are off when they aren’t needed. It’s still kinda high, so I’ve been thinking of ways on how to lower it, and solar panels always seemed like a good idea to invest in. Eventually, they’d pay for themselves right? And you can even sell the excess energy back to the National Grid? That’s cool, but knowing my house, I don’t think I’d have any leftover.

    Anyways, nice post!

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    1. Christopher Roberts
      Christopher Roberts at |

      In the long-term PV solar panels can be a very profitable investment! If you are considering it Mike, take a look at some of the government info on them – here is one useful site: http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Generating-energy/Getting-money-back/Feed-In-Tariffs-scheme-FITs

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    2. Green Iowa Energy@Solar energy

      @ Mike,

      If you’ve done everything you can to increase your home’s energy efficiency, then the next best thing is to add solar or wind energy. I’m not sure how energy pricing is in the UK, but here in the states, we have our regular rates, and we have what’s called a peak energy rate. The peak energy rate can be nearly double what the regular rate costs, and is utilized during the heaviest energy consumption days. Mostly, the hottest days of summer, from late morning until early evening. These are high consumption times and the peak energy rate kicks in to encourage users to minimize electrical usage. This is where solar really shines (pun intended). Your solar panels start producing energy about mid-morning and continue until early evening. So while most people are getting charged higher rates, solar owners are producing the majority of their own energy. For an example, a solar array that produces 1KW of electricity in the spring may save you $0.08/hour. But in the summer, it can save you as much as $0.16/hour. The numbers are only an example, but it’s a figure nobody factors in when considering solar. The solar panels are at peak performance during the times that grid electricity doubles in cost. Then in the overnight hours when the solar panels aren’t producing electricity, the electricity you are buying from the grid is back to its’ regular price. Something to consider.

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      1. Christopher Roberts
        Christopher Roberts at |

        Hi Green, I have a friend with a 4kW system (16 panels) and at the time they installed it, the FIT was guaranteed for 25 years – it is now 20 years.

        The National Grid buy back the equivalent of half what they generate (no matter what they use) and they also benefit from reduced energy bills – which are always on the rise.

        Having had their system for nearly 3 years, they said the whole system is looking like it will pay for itself (so reduced bills+FIT) within the first 6 years. Their system generates around 500kWh a month in the summer and 150kWh per month in the winter.

        That means that their initial investment will receive a total return of more than 4 times their initial investment over the 25 years!

        Even though the FIT has now reduced in the UK, if I were to take out a similar sized system today, it would only take about 12 years to pay for itself – meaning another 8 years of profit from FIT and a lifetime of energy bill reduction.

        Solar is a sound long-term investment.

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  2. Energymixreport
    Energymixreport at |

    I wish we could have more than enough energy for our homes in Nigeria not to talk of selling excess back. I just realize how much we have been missing out on renewable energy sources. I hope we get to this level someday through government support.

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    1. Christopher Roberts
      Christopher Roberts at |

      It is often easy to forget that there are millions of people living without access to clean water and billions without access to electricity. There are various reasons for inequalities, but all I can do is say I hope you get plentiful electricity too in the near future.

      Thanks for the comment.
      Christopher – Admin Team

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  3. Green Iowa Energy
    Green Iowa Energy at |

    Increasing your home’s energy efficiency is a far better choice than switching to renewable energy such as wind and solar. I think renewable energy is a wonderful choice, but making your home use less energy has a greater impact and is often far less expensive on the budget.

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    1. Christopher Roberts
      Christopher Roberts at |

      Making your home more energy efficient is indeed usually much cheaper and is a good way to reduce energy usage, however in the long-run investing in (the right) renewables pays off more than reducing consumption and improving energy efficiency. Ideally you use both.

      In the UK, wind, solar and tidal power are very viable forms of energy generation. With breakthroughs in energy storage, non-renewable are more viable than ever before – everywhere.

      Thanks for adding your view, welcome to the blog :-)
      Christopher – Admin Team

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